Live news on the Russian-Ukrainian war: Kyiv region and Zaporizhzhia hit by new strikes, local officials say | Ukraine

Kyiv region and Zaporizhzhia hit – reports

Russian forces reportedly struck the Kyiv region overnight, according to local media and regional officials.

Kyiv Regional Governor Oleksiy Kuleba did not reveal the location of the attack but said rescue workers were at the scene. Posting an update via the Telegram messaging app, he wrote:

The Russians terrorize the Kyiv region at night. We have several arrivals in one of the communities in the region.

Rescuers and all emergency services are on site. The elimination of the fire and the consequences of the impact is in progress.

The Kyiv City State Administration issued air raid alarm alerts around midnight Wednesday, urging residents to take shelter.

Russian forces also reportedly struck the town of Zaporizhzhia in southeastern Ukraine in what is believed to be another nighttime attack.

Acting Mayor of Zaporizhzhia Anatoly Kurtev reported that Russian forces struck the city and its surroundings, causing a fire.

Key events

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy claimed Ukrainian forces nearly shot down 250 Russian helicopters throughout the war.

Zelenskiy made this claim in his last national address on Wednesday evening:

The total number of downed Russian helicopters is already approaching 250.

The Russian occupiers have already lost so much equipment – ​​aircraft and otherwise – that most of the world’s armies simply do not have and will ever have in service.

Russia will not be able to recoup these losses. I thank all our fighters for this progressive and irreversible demilitarization of the enemy.

Moscow’s announcement earlier this week that his city’s mayor would coordinate the “development of security measures” in Russian regions is likely to lead to greater involvement of regional officials and closer interconnection of regional governors in the system. Russian national security, according to the latest British intelligence report. .

This is yet another measure to organize society and the greater involvement of regional officials is likely to deflect public criticism from national leaders as Russia’s war on Ukraine continues to come under pressure. , the British Ministry of Defense report bed.

However, this “will likely make it more difficult for the Kremlin to insulate Russian society from the effects of the ‘special military operation’ in Ukraine”, according to the ministry.

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An oil depot in the city of Shakhtarskin Ukraine Donetsk The area is on fire, according to local media.

Moscow-appointed city administration chief Vitaly Khotsenko told Russian news agency Tass that 12 fuel tanks were damaged near the station following shelling by Ukrainian troops.

The city’s mayor, Alexander Shatov, claimed Ukrainian troops shelled Shakhtarsk train station, causing the fire, according to the outlet.

Ukraine braces for bitter urban fighting over Kherson

The prospect of bitter urban fighting for Kherson, the largest city under Russian control, has grown closer as Ukrainian forces have moved ever closer in their campaign in the south which has seen Russian forces pushed back.

As Russian-installed authorities encourage residents to flee to the east bank of the Dnieper, Oleksiy Arestovych, adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, says there are no signs Russian forces are preparing to give up the city.

Arestovych said Tuesday evening in an online video:

With Kherson, everything is clear. The Russians are reconstituting, reinforcing their group there.

This means no one is preparing to step down. On the contrary, the hardest of battles will take place for Kherson.

Before and after satellite imagery to track cultural damage in Ukraine

The The United Nations is using before-and-after satellite imagery to systematically monitor the cultural destruction inflicted on Ukraine by Russia’s war, announcing that it will publicly launch its tracking platform in a few weeks.

The platform, which will be launched by the UN cultural agency Unescowill assess the impact on architecture, art, historic buildings and other cultural heritage of Ukraine.

This satellite image provided by Maxar Satellite Image Analysis via Unosat, shows the Drama Theater in Mariupol, Ukraine on March 9, 2022, left, and the same site on May 12, 2022. Photography: AP

A first list revealed damage to 207 cultural sites since the start of the Russian invasion eight months ago, including 88 religious sites, 15 museums, 76 buildings of historical and/or artistic interest, 18 monuments and 10 libraries.

Kyiv region and Zaporizhzhia hit – reports

Russian forces reportedly struck the Kyiv region overnight, according to local media and regional officials.

Kyiv Regional Governor Oleksiy Kuleba did not reveal the location of the attack but said rescue workers were at the scene. Posting an update via the Telegram messaging app, he wrote:

The Russians terrorize the Kyiv region at night. We have several arrivals in one of the communities in the region.

Rescuers and all emergency services are on site. The elimination of the fire and the consequences of the impact is in progress.

The Kyiv City State Administration issued air raid alarm alerts around midnight Wednesday, urging residents to take shelter.

Russian forces also reportedly struck the town of Zaporizhzhia in southeastern Ukraine in what is believed to be another nighttime attack.

Acting Mayor of Zaporizhzhia Anatoly Kurtev reported that Russian forces struck the city and its surroundings, causing a fire.

Summary and welcome

Hello and welcome to the Guardian’s live coverage of the war in Ukraine. I’m Samantha Lock and I’ll bring you all the latest developments as they unfold over the next few hours.

Russian forces reportedly hit the Kyiv region and the southeastern Ukrainian city of Zaporizhia overnight, according to local media and regional officials.

Ukrainian troops are ready to fight for the strategic south Kherson region, which Russia appears to be bolstering with more troops and supplies.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy hinted there would be good news from the front but gave no details in his latest national address.

If you have just joined us, here are all the latest developments:

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin would have supervised the exercises of the country strategic nuclear forces involving multiple ballistic and cruise missile launches. The Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu told Putin that the exercise was intended to simulate a “massive nuclear strike” by Russia in retaliation for a nuclear attack. The drills were seen as a continuation of Moscow’s baseless dirty bomb claims.

  • The prospect of bitter urban fighting for Kherson moved closer when Russian-installed authorities told residents to move to the east bank of the Dnieper. Oleksiy Arestovych, an adviser to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, said there were no signs Russian forces were preparing to abandon the city.

  • Ukraine’s counter-offensive against Russian forces in Kherson was proving more difficult than it was in the northeast because of wet weather and terrainsaid the Ukrainian Minister of Defense.

  • About 70,000 civilians had left their homes in Kherson province within a week, Moscow-based official Vladimir Saldo told a regional TV channel.

  • Ukraine advises refugees living abroad must not return until spring amid growing fears over whether the country damaged energy infrastructure can withstand the winter. With a third of the country’s energy sector compromised, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk warned: “The networks won’t make it… You see what Russia is doing. We have to survive the winter.

  • Around 1,000 bodies – including civilians and children – have been exhumed in the recently liberated Kharkiv region, say the media. This includes the 447 bodies recovered from the mass burial site at Izium.

  • Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov said he did not believe that Russian President Vladimir Putin would use nuclear weapons. Putin has repeatedly said that Russia has the right to defend itself using all the weapons in its arsenal, which includes the world’s largest nuclear stockpile.

  • Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu held a telephone conversation with his Indian and Chinese counterparts and raised Russia’s alleged concerns over the possible use of a “dirty bomb” by Ukraine, the Shoigu ministry said. This followed calls between the defense ministers of Shoigu and NATO on the subject. There is no evidence to support Russia’s “dirty bomb” claim.

  • The United Nations culture agency, Unesco, said it was using before and after satellite images to monitor the cultural destruction inflicted by Russia’s war in Ukraine, and would soon release its tracking platform. Unesco said it had verified damage to 207 cultural sites, including religious sites, museums, buildings of historical and/or artistic interest, monuments and libraries.

  • UN aid chief Martin Griffiths said he was “relatively optimistic” that a UN-brokered deal allowing Black Sea grain exports from Ukraine would be extended beyond mid-November. Griffiths traveled to Moscow this month with senior UN trade official Rebeca Grynspan for talks with Russian officials on the deal, which also aims to facilitate Russian grain and fertilizer exports. to world markets.

  • The remains of a US citizen killed in fighting in Ukraine were handed over to Ukrainian authorities and would soon be returned to the person’s family, a US State Department spokesperson said.

  • The European Union could introduce a gas price cap this winter limit price spikes if countries give Brussels a mandate to propose the measure.

  • EU regulators are considering extending simplified state aid rules which allow governments to support war-affected businesses in Ukraine until the end of 2023, and with larger amounts allowed, said competition chief Margrethe Vestager. The looser rules were introduced in March and revised in July.

James C. Tibbs